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A Christian Transhumanist Association

After a discussion of the possibility to create a Christian Transhumanist Association, Micah Redding has written a call for interest in a Christian Transhumanist Association.

Last month I wrote: “Christian Transhumanists like Frank J. Tipler, James McLean Ledford and Micah Redding promote a compassionate, smiling, smi2ling, scientific, transhumanist interpretation of Christianity similar to to Nikolai Fedorov and the Russian Cosmists. There is a Facebook group and some good blogs for Christian Transhumanists, but no “Christian Transhumanist Association” that I am aware of. I think creating one would be a good idea.”

Micah Redding has written a call for interest in a Christian Transhumanist Association (full text below). Of course I signed up, and I hope many others will do so. Please use this form to express your interest.

Micah writes for a wide Christian audience, and doesn’t cover explicitly the more radical and visionary aspects of transhumanism, but I think these are strongly implied.

Interested in Christian Transhumanism?
by Micah Redding

Transhumanism is the ethical use of technology to extend human ability, and to improve the human condition.

Transhumanism holds that we should not be limited by the way things are, or by the way they have been in the past; that we should not resign ourselves to a world with extreme poverty, malnutrition, and disease — but that we can and should work to overcome these and all other obstacles to improving human life.

Christian Transhumanism holds that this viewpoint arises naturally from our scriptural and spiritual heritage — that the biblical view of humanity is one in which we live out the likeness and image of God by creating new things and bringing new life into the world — that in the pattern of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, we continually venture out on faith to build new futures in the wilderness.

Christian Transhumanism holds that this understanding of human identity was embodied in the life of Jesus, who transformed our vision of the boundaries of human life, and self-sacrificially opened up new possibilities for the future of the human race.

We believe that it is crucial that Christians come to know and embrace this vision of humanity, so that we may expand our imagination, and engage proactively in building the future. We believe that we should not be content with simply reacting to things as they happen, but should be actively involved in shaping and growing new possibilities in the world. We believe that the provocative biblical understanding of humanity is a powerful vision and a gift that should be shared.

For all of these reasons, we think that it is time for Christian Transhumanists to step forward and invite others to join with us in imagining, expressing, and working towards our best dreams for the world and the future.

If any of this resonates with you, let’s continue the discussion:

Interested in Christian Transhumanism?

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(Image credits: adapted from original photo)

  • Saving lives and making people feel better is great, but transhumanism is ultimately about immortality – a material salvation – the opposite of a spiritual salvation.

    This global entity that we are creating through our blending with machinery is not going to give up the ghost one day to go meet Jesus. There is no spiritual salvation being offered by transhumanism.

    Nothing wrong with Christians being involved in transhumanism, but be involved from the point of awareness, not blind acceptance.

    • Giulio Prisco

      @Michael – transhumanism is _also_ about immortality, among many other things.

      As I see it, transhumanism is about transcending all limits, leaving biology behind, moving to space, and joining the community of advanced civilizations among the stars. I think we will find Jesus there.

  • Many Christians (such as NT Wright – leading New Testament scholar, influential Christian writer, and the former Bishop of Durham) would say that Christianity is very definitely NOT simply about a spiritual salvation.

    Rather, Christianity wants to see the salvation of our complete selves, including our bodies, our environment, and our world. The core hope of Christianity is not that we can one day “give up the ghost to go meet Jesus”, but that we can “bring heaven to earth”, transforming the world through compassionate creation.

    Transhumanism, too, at least implicitly desires more than just bigger robots and more powers. Transhumanism looks for the improvement of the emotional, psychological, and material self. The fact that transhumanism has traditionally been weaker on the emotional and psychological side of things is exactly the reason to bolster it by speaking meaningfully into the intersection of spirituality and transhumanism.

    • Giulio Prisco

      @Micah re “The fact that transhumanism has traditionally been weaker on the emotional and psychological side of things is exactly the reason to bolster it by speaking meaningfully into the intersection of spirituality and transhumanism.”

      Yes, exactly. And speaking meaningfully into the intersection of spirituality and transhumanism will bolster spirituality as well, by making it fully compatible with science.

      The scientific and spiritual mindsets have been apart for a long time, with each rejecting the other, but we are here to show that the scientific and spiritual mindsets can not only peacefully co-exist in the same person and society, but even support each other.

  • Mitch

    Since I am always odd man out, I wish Micah Redding, all the best, in his Tranhumanist-Christian endevour. If someone questions the sanctity of Christian Transhuamnism, just ask: “Now, what do you have against Steve Austin, The Bionic Man? Interestingly, as i was reading, a thought jumped up, concerning the even, more, profound, need, for an Islamic Transhumanist philosophy.

    On, the other hand there’s nothing to stop anyone, from espousing the technology to become a flying bomb, but the longevity, that Transhumanism seeks, the scientific views of an afterlife that it speaks to, might just persuade some of their faithful, reconsider what is demanded of them, by God?

    It’s a hypothesis anyway. Also, besides pursuing the Transhumanist path, it might just make the world less violent, maybe? It would be nice if this worked on both counts.

    Spud100

    • Giulio Prisco

      @Spud100 re “Interestingly, as i was reading, a thought jumped up, concerning the even, more, profound, need, for an Islamic Transhumanist philosophy.”

      I don’t know as much as I would like to know about Islam, but it has many parallels with Christianity, so I guess it must contain similar openings to transhumanist philosophy.

      It would be interesting to organize a discussion in Islamic transhumanism. I know a few transhumanists who were raised in Islam, they are not practicing Muslims (as far as I know), but I guess they would have interesting comment. I will write to them.

  • GPA

    It’s nice to see Christians that are open-minded to the inevitable.

    https://vimeo.com/69469273

  • Martin Ciupa

    I am interested in promoting a good inclusive life for all, free of poverty, injustice and disease. A less material and more spiritual existence. I believe we can be techno-progressive without jettisoning the essential virtue of humanity, and that to be truly progressive we need to be ethically progressive also. Transhumanist dreams, morally and selflessly realised, could lead to a utopia for all, but in the hands of the selfish and spiritually vacuous could be a a dystopian nightmare. It seems to me that technology future is often like that, open to use and misuse.

  • Alan Brooks

    “…moving to space, and joining the community of advanced civilizations among the stars. I think we will find Jesus there.”

    But if we find Satan among the stars, do we make a U-turn to return to Earth?