teleXLR8

teleXLR8 overview

The teleXLR8 online talk program based on OpenQwaq has been covered by Hypergrid Businessas an online open TED, using modern telepresence technology for ideas worth spreading, and as a next generation, fully interactive TV network with a participative audience.

In August 2011 the teleXLR8 project has been re-launched. The first talk has been announced by KurzweilAI: “teleXLR8 is reopening on Sunday 21 10 a.m. PST with a talk by [experimental quantum physicist/programmer] Suzanne Gildert on Hack the Multiverse!. The teleXLR8 online talk program is “a telepresence community for cultural acceleration,” as their blog puts it. Translation: an audiovideo seminar — think TED in Second Life, plus webcam videoconferencing and video session recording.

TED (the well known Technology, Entertainment and Design global set of conferences and talks on “ideas worth spreading”) is a role model. teleXLR8 offers similar content with fully interactive online talks and discussions using modern video conferencing and virtual reality technology, almost as good as being there in person.

The previous phase of teleXLR8 project, based on Teleplace, has been running as a free, invitation-only beta on the Teleplace servers and network infrastructure since March 2010, and produced many online talks by well-known emerging technologies experts and futurists, and online extensions to conferences such as the ASIM 2010 Conference, satellite to the Singularity Summit 2010, and the TransVision 2010 Conference. In the latter, streamed interactively as a full 2-way “mixed-reality” event with both local and remote speakers, the participants in Milan were joined by remote participants from all over the world.

VIDEO – teleXLR8 highlights 2010 – This short video features some highlights of the teleXLR8 program in 2010.
Short version (5 min 40 sec) – Youtube | Vimeo
Long version (1 hour 5 min) – Youtube | Vimeo
The full video coverage of our 2010 program can be found at our channels on Youtube | Vimeo.

Though the project has only been promoted in the relatively small community of future studies and “Singularity” enthusiasts, there have been many more requests to join than could be granted, and the project has been frequently covered by the blogosphere and the online press. The early beta user group has about 80 members including some very well known and influential persons. All talks have been recorded on video and posted to video sharing sites the day after the talk. The videos have been seen by tens of thousands of viewers and covered by important technology oriented websites including internetACTU, IEET, KurzweilAI, H+ Magazine, Next Big Future, HyperGrid Business and Slashdot.

At the end of 2010 the teleXLR8 project, based on the industrial strength commercial Teleplace platform, was put on hold waiting for funding. In May 2011 Teleplace made the visionary decision to open source their technology as OpenQwaq. This permits continuing teleXLR8 as a free, invitation-only program based on OpenQwaq, with more frequent talks, workshops and conferences. In May 2011 Teleplace made the visionary decision to open source their technology as OpenQwaq. In August 2011 the teleXLR8 project has been re-launched using 3D ICC‘s Immersive Terf proprietary version of OpenQwaq.

In August 2011 the teleXLR8 project has been re-launched. The first talk has been announced by KurzweilAI: “teleXLR8 is reopening on Sunday 21 10 a.m. PST with a talk by [experimental quantum physicist/programmer] Suzanne Gildert on Hack the Multiverse!. The teleXLR8 online talk program is “a telepresence community for cultural acceleration,” as their blog puts it. Translation: an audiovideo seminar — think TED in Second Life, plus webcam videoconferencing and video session recording.

Suzanne outlined the basics of Quantum Computing, described the the D-Wave One quantum computer, and explained how to program it. For those who missed the talk, the full video coverage is on the teleXLR8 video channel on YouTube.

The teleXLR8 project will continue with more frequent talks, seminars, online conferences and mixed-reality extension of traditional conferences, interviews, talk shows, and e-learning courses. Thanks to the built-in video recording feature of OpenQwaq, we will post the full video coverage to our video sharing channels on Blip.tv, Youtube and Vimeo after a few days. Participation in the realtime interactive sessions is free, but invitation-only: if you wish to participate, please contact us, join the mailing list or the groups on Facebook and Linkedin, and ask for an invitation.

In an interview published on H+ Magazine, I said: “I use Teleplace [now OpenQwaq] because, based on my (quite extensive) knowledge of and experience in this sector, at this moment Teleplace [now OpenQwaq] is by far the best operational technology for online meetings, workshops, presentations, seminars, conferences and e-learning.” Modern desktop telepresence technology can effectively open conferences to remote participants and, with OpenQwaq, online meetings and conferences have already passed the tipping point of critical usability and performance. Online events are now a very useful complement, or a faster and cheaper alternative, to traditional conferences.

teleXLR8 is described as a “telepresence community for cultural acceleration” because interactive and immersive telepresence technology, with integrated videoconferencing, document sharing and collaboration in 3D virtual reality, can accelerate global cultural development by permitting people to fully participate, interactively and immersively, in their favorite interest groups and intentional communities, independently of their geographical locations. The explosion of the Internet in the 90s has, by permitting the rapid spread of world-changing ideas, initiated this process whose results are beginning to be very clearly evident in today’s world. The explosion of telepresence in the 10s will accelerate it forward. By reducing the need for physical travel, telepresence can also make our planet greener, and give us a better quality of life. More on our manifesto “Telepresence Education for a Smarter World“.